gkam - Feb 10, 2018

How do you get the salts out of the media?

Turgent - Feb 11, 2018

reverse osmosis membranes, precipitation of some salts, and vaporization

Osiris1 - Feb 11, 2018

We simply can not get this tech into the hands of de-salination plant engineers and designers fast enough, especially here in California! We have thousands of miles of sea coast and a terrific drought that is only going to get worse with global warming. And we have an ignorant fool for a president that is too mentally old and set in his ways to the point of being a danger to himself and others. No 25th Amendment or impeachment is going to come from a billionaire bribed majority party that put this danger to the public good or his toadies into office on the backs of: 1) crooked blood money from super rich foreigners and Russian agents; 2) gutter politics; 3) internally conflicted ignorant democratic opposition that is yet stuck on 'superdelegates' and anti-second Amendment freaks= impotent. So we here are on our own! Solutions must come from us! This tech or osmosis are our only choices and we got to pay for it ourselves. THANK YOU GOD!

gkam - Feb 11, 2018

Turge, I meant out of the media which traps the minerals. You are not going to vaporize calcium and Magnesium and Iron. How will they get it out of the molecular traps to re-use them? Or do they just throw them "away"?

gculpex - Feb 11, 2018

Turge, I meant out of the media which traps the minerals. You are not going to vaporize calcium and Magnesium and Iron. How will they get it out of the molecular traps to re-use them? Or do they just throw them "away"?

More likely they are either recycled or thrown away.

mackita - Feb 11, 2018

This technology aims higher than just desalination - IMO it could be tested for separation of lithium during brine mining or even from marine water.

Turgent - Feb 11, 2018

Turge, I meant out of the media which traps the minerals. You are not going to vaporize calcium and Magnesium and Iron. How will they get it out of the molecular traps to re-use them? Or do they just throw them "away"?


As regard Ca,Na, Mg, etc., I meant boil off the water, then distill. For molecular filtering reverse flow and flush.

Turgent - Feb 11, 2018

gkam

What I don't know is how they keep F, Cl, and Br ions from getting through as their ionic radius are so small.

savvys84 - Feb 12, 2018

this has great potential

crlMidi - Feb 12, 2018

The article is not clear regarding the projected energy consumption with respect to the thermodynamic limit for any reversible desalination process. See http://urila.trip...tion.htm which was the first hit I got from a simple web search. All the article does is imply vaguely that reverse osmosis exceeds that limit by a factor of 2 or 3. Please could we have some precise scientific information?

mackita - Feb 12, 2018

Ultimately, no desalination process can overcome the thermodynamic limit of desalination (~ 0.72 kW/m^3 for marine water), and we'reĀ pretty close to approaching that limit. A state-of-the-art facility is now within a factor of two of the theoretical energy minimum, and only 25 percent higher than the realistic minimum for the current reverse osmosis process.

Turgent - Feb 12, 2018

I did read:
http://urila.trip...tion.htm
https://arstechni...it-gets/
And the paper http://advances.s...eaaq0066

This paper speaks to subnanometer filtration. One nanometer equals 1000 picometers. A Cl anion would have a diameter of less than 160 nanometers and a Na ion less than 380, depending on which, calculated or empirical radii used.
This method of ion extraction looks to be very different than simply filtering Na and Cl ions. The top of the illustration on page 3 illustrates what this paper defines as a hydrated ion. This is different than simple hydration. The number of weakly (my guess) bound H2O atom is huge per anion and cation, making the hydrated ion relatively huge. The ionic attraction of H2O is due to the fact that H2O is diamagnetic or the charge on water is polar.

cont.

Turgent - Feb 12, 2018

Note the orientation of the water molecules. This makes the hydrated diameter relatively huge. In the top illustration on page 4 lower right quarter illustration is the sieve which uses a dehydration/hydration process. This appears to be a novel approach.

This is a non-expert interpretation of the paper.

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