arcticman - Dec 06, 2016

Human sourced CO2 is no longer the primary source of CO2.
Last year, CO2 went up about 4ppm, which is more than double the average annual rise for the previous ten or fifteen years.
This added CO2 obviously is coming from permafrost thawing. This feedback has really kicked in, and it is likely to accelerate.
That is, soon we will see annual CO2 increases of 6ppm, 8ppm, and maybe even 10ppm.
Even at 4ppm, we will see 500ppm CO2 by 2040, and 700ppm by 2100.
The computations of the models are not taking into account accelerating feedbacks.
A 3C rise by 2100 is unrealistically optimistic, IMO.

Paulw789 - Dec 06, 2016

These borehole temperature models are likely inaccurate.

The authors, Cuffey and Clow, undertook similar analysis on Greenland and over-estimated the temperature change by 4 or 5 times compared to the standard isotope methods.

Caution in using these values for Antarctica.

cjones1 - Dec 06, 2016

Due to the Piri Reis map detailing the Antarctic coastline, more research is needed to uncover Antarctica's climate history of warming.

antigoracle - Dec 06, 2016

The new and "improved" GloBull warming, now with 100% more bull.
FACT: Not only has the Antarctic been cooling for decades but has also been gaining ice.
So, what is an AGW Cult to do in their desperation to feed the hungry, ignorant Chicken Littles. Well, just make bull up from 20000 years ago and claim it's proof for their prophesies of doom and gloom, despite the fact that reality defies them at every turn.

Windchaser - Dec 06, 2016

Human sourced CO2 is no longer the primary source of CO2.
Last year, CO2 went up about 4ppm, which is more than double the average annual rise for the previous ten or fifteen years.
This added CO2 obviously is coming from permafrost thawing. This feedback has really kicked in, and it is likely to accelerate.


Nah. In El Nino years, the warm water that's been pushed up in the west Pacific in prevous years gets spread around on the ocean surfaces. This means the ocean surfaces are warmer, and warmer water can't hold as much CO2. So atmospheric carbon dioxide always increases faster during El Nino years, and slower during La Nina years.

Now, if we see this acceleration also during La Nina years... then yeah, we're screwed. But we can't mix up the CO2 release from warmer oceans with the CO2 release from warming tundra.

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